Desert Mountain Times
Desert Mountain Times - People, Plants and Places of Desert Southwest

Venerable ag agent guides UTEP SunScape class thru gardens

Retired agriculture agent John M. White, seen Oct. 25 showing students at UTEP's Centennial Museum's SunScape Class some of the unique plants in the surrounding Chihuahuan Desert Gardens. (DMT photo)

Retired agriculture agent John M. White, seen Oct. 25 showing students at UTEP’s Centennial Museum’s SunScape class some of the unique plants in the surrounding Chihuahuan Desert Gardens, may be the No. 1 go-to person concerning plants in the El Paso/Juarez/Las Cruces, Upper Rio Grande metroplex. (DMT photos)

 

(Readers note: My apologies for being late with this. Remember a professor in graduate school telling me once, no way could anyone be any slower than I was then. He was wrong. At 71 I’m much slower! Happy New Year to y’all!!! – db)

 

By Dan Bodine

 

EL PASO–Students at a fall SunScape class at University of Texas at El Paso Oct. 25 couldn’t have asked for a better guide to plants at the school’s acclaimed Chihuahuan Desert Gardens at the Centennial Museum.

John M. White himself, retired county agricultural agent and botanical curator for the Museum, did the honors.

“These plants really get into your blood Continue reading

Philodendron burned in greenhouse, had to be moved

Julietta in the ground last fall as I was hurrying to build a protective greenhouse around her before winter's freezing nights hit. (DMT photos)

Julietta our philodendron, seen in the ground last fall, as I was hurrying to build a protective greenhouse around her before winter’s freezing nights hit. She made it thru the winter OK; for once, she didn’t freeze back.  But it was the scorching heat of early June when she said, Get me out of here! And I realized I had a move to make. (DMT photos)

 

By Dan Bodine

 

The word on the street about these philodendron plants is that they’re so easy to care for Ned in the First Reader shouldn’t ever have to strain an eyebrow on advancing to the 2nd.

So how come I didn’t think about the scorching heat inside a small greenhouse when the desert’s old man winter suddenly turned into a scalding summer? Continue reading

More water’s returning to the Rio Bosque Wetlands Park

Rio Bosque Wetlands

Friends of the Rio Bosque Wetlands Park near Socorro are seen this past summer on one of their clean-up days. The park, on what once was a bend in the Rio Grande, is an effort to restore a riparian habitat. Water is now flowing and thanks to a recent project soon there’ll be a continuos flow. Read the story below.  (Image from Friends of Rio Bosque Wetlands Park)

 

Rio Bosque Wetlands Update — Steady, continuous water is coming!

Rio Bosque Wetlands Park is a 372-acre City of El Paso park located in southeast El Paso County near Socorro — enclosed by irrigation canals and drains on three sides, and abuts the Rio Grande on the other. Continue reading

Could El Paso fracking help pay for solar canal covers?

Above is seen an irrigation canal fed from a nearby river that's covered with solar panels. The gains, of course, are the extra electricity generated by the panels and curtailing evaporation losses. (Image from elpasonaturally.com

Above is seen an irrigation canal in India covered with solar panels, part of a conservation system. The gains, of course, are both the extra electricity generated by the panels and curtailing huge, water evaporation losses from the canals. Particularly in the desert this would be useful. This photo and story was posted by Jim Tolbert, a local and respected conservationist, ironically only as a “macro” example for the government in dealing with the critical water shortage–before he later would report of the potential fracking operations northeast of El Paso. The story below argues for state or local help. Overcoming challenges to exponentially parlay growth opportunities for the public is the American Success Story. (Image from elpasonaturally.com)

 

By Dan Bodine

An Analysis

 

News

Just northwest of El Paso, and east of Dell City touching down into Hudspeth and El Paso counties, lies a huge project whose operator predicts will turn El Paso into another "Permian Basin" market.

Some 60 miles east-northeast of El Paso and near Dell City in northwest Hudspeth County lies a huge project whose operator predicts will turn El Paso into another “Permian Basin” market. But with fracking comes many environmental concerns. The issue is how to address them. (Image from elpasonaturally.com)

from a local conser-vation blogger that El Paso may have a huge, “Permian Basin”-style, fracking operation for oil and natural gas on its northeast doorstep no doubt has raised both economic eyebrows and environmental concerns. Do we pop the cork or blow the whistle? Continue reading