Desert Mountain Times
Desert Mountain Times - People, Plants and Places of Desert Southwest

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The newsletter is coming. Posts and articles relating to the weekly newsletter will be posted here.

You will also find the discussion board from the drop down menu. From here I plan to discuss key topics from the weekly newsletter as well as this is the opportunity for everyone to comment on their DIY projects or about the topics mentioned on this page.

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Happy Reading

DMT to get newsletter; Santa Teresa due big rail port, too

In the middle of the desert? Manufacturing plants sprouting up like crazy and now there'll be a new international railport in this "Nowhere" place to handle all the exports? Yep. Giant computer maker Foxconn already had this complex in San Jerónomo, seen here just south of the Santa Teresa border crossing in 2011. As industrial production surges in Mexico, companies are increasingly interested in locating in what is actually a combined San Jerónimo-Santa Teresa bi-national border community, but the region can't develop new industrial space fast enough. (Image from Albuquerque Business First bizjournal.com)

In the middle of the empty desert? Manufacturing plants sprouting up like crazy? And now there’ll be a new international railport in this “Nowhere” place to handle all the exports? Yep. Giant computer maker Foxconn already had this complex in San Jerónomo, seen here just south of the Santa Teresa border crossing in 2011. As industrial production surges in Mexico, companies are increasingly interested in locating in what is actually a combined San Jerónimo-Santa Teresa bi-national border community, but the region can’t develop new industrial space fast enough. (Image from Albuquerque Business First bizjournal.com)

 

(Readers Note: We’re in the process of launching a yáhoo desert gardening newsletter touching on urban sprawl from this site, and things are a bit whacky! For us backyarders, gotta be on all four’s for it! A little country philosophizing will be in it, too, of course.

But those of you already subscribing to the DMT blog, to subscribe to the weekly newsletter, you must please go to the right and fill in your name and email address again. Otherwise, the whacky subscription autoresponder on this site will drop you from the (to be) newsletters list. [More about it later; just hang in with me!] Continue reading

Union Pacific to turn Santa Teresa-Jerónimo port gold

OFFICIAL OPENING: Chihuahua, Mexico, Gov. César Duarte, left, Sen. Tom Udall (D-NM), center, and New Mexico's Republican Gov. Susana Martinez hammer golden spikes during the railroad hub opening May 28 at Union Pacific Railway's new $400 intermodal train facility. (Associated Press photo from abqjournal.com)

OFFICIAL OPENING: Chihuahua, Mexico, Gov. César Duarte, left, Sen. Tom Udall (D-NM), center, and New Mexico’s Republican Gov. Susana Martinez hammer golden spikes during the railroad hub opening May 28 at Union Pacific Railway’s new $400 intermodal train facility. (Associated Press photo from abqjournal.com)

 

By Dan Bodine

 

SANTA TERESA, N.M. — New Mexico State Legislature’s decision a while back to drop a diesel fuel tax so the Union Pacific Railroad could build an intermodal ramp loading facility just west of El Paso is a deal that looks to be sealed in gold.

Gold as in an increasing amount of international trade crossing at the new Santa Teresa U.S. Port of Entry, and jobs added to this region’s bi-national labor force. Construction jobs alone climbed to 3,000, and put the project in a year ahead of schedule. An economic bloom in the Chihuahuan Desert.

Some in Juarez, however, over on the Mexican side, are questioning the port’s costs. Such as utilities, housing, and building a new community for the workers. But there were certainly no such thoughts around when UP officially opened the mammoth $418 million rail yard last month. Everything was golden. Continue reading

Lincoln as El Paso ISD central office could be “love fest”

0522_NWS_EPT_L_LINCOLNFOLO 3_RRR

Hector Gonzales, member of Lincoln Center Conservation Committee, shows a temporary court injunction preventing Texas Department of Transportation from demolishing an old abandoned El Paso school building recently located adjacent a freeway overpass in El Paso’s Lincoln Park district. Neighborhood activists consider the building a cultural icon and May 21 protested a state highway department attempt to tear it down. The location was the site of the first school for African-Americans and Hispanics in El Paso, which now is part of Lincoln Park, and  thus steeped in cultural treasures. (photos by Ruben R. Ramirez, El Paso Times)

 

By Dan Bodine

 

EL PASO–No one has asked me for my two cents. But I have a suggestion for the El Paso City Council concerning demolishing the city’s first minority school building, for years called the Lincoln Center.

Approve a resolution asking the State of Texas, who wants to tear it down, to sell it instead for a modest fee to El Paso Independent School District, to be used as their new central administration headquarters.

And with it, request some “creative engineering” to keep it out of harms way Continue reading